What Sony Patent for Video Recording Contact Lens Means

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Sony's Recording Contact Lens Diagram | CNET.com

Sony has been awarded a patent for contact lenses that record video. What will the future of smart lenses look like in the future, especially now that video recording is on the table? You can bet someone’s already working on a compatible pop-up ad.

Google Glass represented a gateway for interacting with the IoT and AR technology, but its development has been stymied by many drawbacks to the system -not to mention it’s an obvious fashion faux pas.

A Smart Contact Lens Learns From its Mistakes

If you were counting on the Glass to be your visual link to the IoT, fear not. The idea hasn’t been scrapped. Google is still working out the kinks on the Glass, and more recently Sony has been awarded a patent for a contact lens that can record video.

#Sony has patented a #video #recording #contactlens.Click To Tweet

Sony is departing from the concept of improving vision and providing an AR display. Instead, Sony gives users the ability to start recording their surroundings with a few deliberate blinks.

The data storage and image capture tech are in the iris of the lens, and there is even a generator that powers the device using the movements of the eye.

The lens isn’t practical just yet, but Sony is working on it.

Google made a big splash when they announced Glass. Its failure emboldened other big companies to do better rather than ignore the inevitable need for a visual link with our Internet of Things.

Is This the Future of Wearables?

A smart contact lens has obvious potential. It gives us an AR heads-up display, allowing our favorite locations to take on new and exciting properties. Watch your favorite digital shorts as you walk the dog.

With Sony’s patent for video capture, we are much closer to a contact lens that could subtly record whatever its user sees.

With the Internet in our field of vision, relevant data is always on hand. The need for computers or mobile devices could vanish. We could even implant AI to assist the blind.

AR-enabled contacts would use video capture to record an area, allowing a hiker to share fantastical sights with their far-away family.

Smart glasses, goggles, or contacts would finally give users a practical entry into using AR regularly. Eventually, they may even change how we conceive of the IoT.

Visual wearables are promising. Once Sony and Google hash our their designs, we’ll be glad to test them out.

Potential Drawbacks

There is no telling what kind of interface smart lenses will have, especially ones devoted to video capture.

If we start viewing the Internet in our glasses and contacts, next generation advertising would come straight to our faces. As much as I hope that regulations would keep advertisements from entering personal visual feeds, legislation hindering companies’ ability to make money doesn’t have a great track record.

In short, we should expect Internet-style pop-ups.

Nobody explains the future better than Tom Cruise. Spielberg’s 2002 MINORITY REPORT:

Add a camera into a smart contact and companies will immediately use user data to construct targeted advertisments.

To dig deeper, what exact privacy concerns does this idea raise?

Relying on smart lenses could make us vulnerable. If these devices could be hacked, imagine the activities that could be interrupted (driving, orating, etc).

Also, the prospect of biometric identification makes identity theft even more terrifying. Luckily for us, Hackers can’t attack something that’s not developed yet.

Edgy Labs Readers: We’re excited about this technology (mostly). Are you? What reservations do you have, if any?

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